Join storytellers, game developers, makers, creative technologists, and experience designers in a special FREE one day story lab. An experiment in co-authorship – Sherlock Holmes and the internet of things invites 25 participants to step into a collaborative design space. Together participants will lay the ground work for a storyworld that will play out globally through a series of connected objects that become conduits for a re-imaging of Sherlock Homes. 
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Join storytellers, game developers, makers, creative technologists, and experience designers in a special FREE one day story lab. An experiment in co-authorship – Sherlock Holmes and the internet of things invites 25 participants to step into a collaborative design space. Together participants will lay the ground work for a storyworld that will play out globally through a series of connected objects that become conduits for a re-imaging of Sherlock Homes. 

APPLY NOW

With 130 million views a month Stampy Cat is evolving the “Let’s Play” genre. TubeFilter takes a deep dive on Mr. Stampy Cat.
The British Invasion - Mr. Stampy Cat is ready to move into your living room.
"I now understand why Stampy is legendary in the tween and teenage crowd and why he has been in the top 10 most viewed channels on YouTube for months. He is simply an amazing modern storyteller. He is a natural with kids, and just because he is telling stories via instructional YouTube videos does not take away this appeal. If you are skeptical, watch his 2013 Christmas Special “Saving Santa” or his “Melon Moment” video."  READ MORE

With 130 million views a month Stampy Cat is evolving the “Let’s Play” genre. TubeFilter takes a deep dive on Mr. Stampy Cat.

The British Invasion - Mr. Stampy Cat is ready to move into your living room.

"I now understand why Stampy is legendary in the tween and teenage crowd and why he has been in the top 10 most viewed channels on YouTube for months. He is simply an amazing modern storyteller. He is a natural with kids, and just because he is telling stories via instructional YouTube videos does not take away this appeal. If you are skeptical, watch his 2013 Christmas Special “Saving Santa” or his “Melon Moment” video."  READ MORE

When a company called Estimote released its first product last year, it was about the size of of a kiwi fruit that had been cut in half. Its diminutive wireless Bluetooth beacons were (and still are) designed to replace things like signs and information placards by sending that to the screen of your smartphone. At the same time, the beacons would help retail shops, museums, and restaurants keep track of where visitors were going.
But there were a few things holding the initial version back. There’s an accelerometer to track motion, but people would just stick the beacons on walls or pillars where they remained stationary. And while aesthetically pleasing with bright colors and a polygonal form, they were still big enough that some places affixed them out of sight.
READ MORE
via the Verge 

When a company called Estimote released its first product last year, it was about the size of of a kiwi fruit that had been cut in half. Its diminutive wireless Bluetooth beacons were (and still are) designed to replace things like signs and information placards by sending that to the screen of your smartphone. At the same time, the beacons would help retail shops, museums, and restaurants keep track of where visitors were going.

But there were a few things holding the initial version back. There’s an accelerometer to track motion, but people would just stick the beacons on walls or pillars where they remained stationary. And while aesthetically pleasing with bright colors and a polygonal form, they were still big enough that some places affixed them out of sight.

READ MORE

via the Verge 

Sensors And Sensitivity

via TechCrunch

There’s only so much practical real estate on the human body for wearables — unless you’re willing to revive the over-accessorizing trend of the 1980s.

So what if everyday objects that we interact with — whether it’s by resting against them or holding onto them — were to house the sensors that keep tabs on us? Anti-wearables, if you like, given that the technology becomes invisibly embedded into everyday objects.

This is the sensible trajectory of connected sensor technology. The world around us gains the ability to perceive us, rather than wearable sensors trying to figure out what’s going on in our environment by taking a continuous measure of us.

In one example currently being worked on, PLUX – Wireless Biosignals, the makers of a low cost, modular bio-sensor kit called BITalino, are embedding sensors into car seats, to offer a non-wearable way for human health signals to be quantified while a person is driving a car.

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Latest installation by Montreal-based media and entertainment studio Moment Factory invites visitors to explore the illuminated paths of an enchanted forest in Québec, Canada. Foresta Lumina, a 2 km long trail, meanders through the Parc de la Gorge de Coaticook full of colorful light installations, visual projections and chilling sound effects.

According to the creative studio, Foresta Lumina strives to reveal park’s natural beauties and mysteries. Along the nocturnal stroll through the forest, visitors are acquainted with the region’s fictitious heritage and forest mythology: fairies, spirits and other bewitched mythical creatures. “It’s all about goosebumps,” says Gabriel Pontbriand of Moment Factory.

Read more

hat tip StoryForward

In this presentation, Geoloqi co-founder Amber Case will take you on a journey through the history of calm technology, wearable computing, and how developers and designers can make apps “ambient” and inspire delight instead of constant interaction

This talk will focus on trends in wearable computing starting from the 1970’s-2010’s and how mobile interfaces should take advantage of location, proximity and haptics to help improve our lives instead of get in the way.

via dConstruct

Internet Of Things Brings Harry Potter’s “Marauders Map” To Life ]

As objects become increasingly connected, they become potential conduits for new forms of storytelling and interaction. Alexis Lloyd researches emerging technology and user behaviors, exploring how these trends may affect news information and media. 

Alexis Lloyd, Creative Director, The New York Times R&D Lab

via TFI

Rewriting with Rapid Prototyping

Over the years I’ve written about the rapid commoditization of technology and its impact on entertainment. I’ve waxed on about the value of data and the promise of the “Internet of things,” with its ability to harness networks and sensor technology to tell stories. My work over the last decade has experimented with new forms and functions of storytelling. I’ve made a conscious effort to diversify the way in which I design, create, fund, produce and distribute my work. The results have been mixed. I’ve had great success and epic failures, but in between rest, valuable insights. I now understand the benefit of failing fast and learning from it. But the entertainment industry has no interest in R&D (research and development). Instead, old models are bled dry, and data is harnessed as a tool to mitigate risk, often resulting in films, TV and music that are homogenized.

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From YouTube

As computing moves from our desktops to our phones, we look into the future to see how technology will become increasingly ingrained in our movements and our active lives. From the Nike Fuelband to Google Glass, consumers are already seeing hints of the future of wearable devices. They have the possibility to make us more knowledgeable about ourselves and our surroundings, and connect us with each other in an uninterrupted, more intimate way. From DIY wearables to high-tech sensors and smart fabrics, the years ahead will show how integrated technology can impact our lives for the better.

Featuring:
Sandy Pentland, MIT
Sabine Seymour, Parsons
Steven Dean, G51Studio
Becky Stern, Adafruit

CLASS #8 - The Art of Play

Nick Fortugno of Playmatics and Greg Trefry of Gigantic Mechanic stopped by class to talk about game design and the value of prototyping.

Nick and Greg recommend some games to play 

http://dukope.com/ - papers please

http://simogo.com/work/device-6/ — device6

http://www.newgrounds.com/portal/view/591565 — dys4ria

http://hcsoftware.sourceforge.net/passage/ - passage

http://www.amazon.com/Heavy-Rain-Greatest-Hits-Playstation-3/dp/B002CZ38KA — Heavy Rain

http://www.thelastofus.playstation.com/ — Last of Us

CLASS 3 - Writing for Multiple Platforms & Immersive Experiences

image

Chuck Wendig, Andrea Phillips, J.C. Hutchins and Atley Loughridge discuss writing for multiple platforms and immersive experiences. 

Moderated by Lance Weiler

Recorded Feb 17th @ Columbia University 

Projects referenced

Collapsus 

Deja View

The 33 

Stephen King’s Bag of Bones 

A Map of a Floating City

Body Mind Change

Lyka’s Adventure

My Sky is Falling 

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